• Aigrette: Griffin Tearing with Claws an Ibex

    Technique:
    inlaid
    Dimensions:
    h. 15,6 cm

Aigrette: Griffin Tearing with Claws an Ibex

Created: 4th - 3rd century BC

Found: Siberian collection of Peter I. Russia, Siberia

This plaque in the shape of a griffin standing on the defeated ibex served as decoration of the headdress of a noble warrior. The entire composition is raised in relief from a sheet of gold. The griffin's head is hollow. Its figure seems enormous as compared with that of the ibex. The ibex is depicted with its hind quarters twisted upwards, which is typical of Altaic art. The griffin's body was richly decorated in a cloisonne technique, but the insets have not survived. This composition is similar to that of the leather object found in the Pazyryk Barrow No. 2 in Altai. The ibex's posture and the decorative devices are identical to the depictions on the saddle covers from the Pazyryk Barrow No. 1. Thus this splendid egret can be attributed to the 5th to 4th century BC. Besides, we see that the whole composition, particularly the griffin, was produced under the influence of the Achaemenid art.

Title:

Aigrette: Griffin Tearing with Claws an Ibex

Place of finding:

Archaeological site:

Siberian collection of Peter I

Material:

Technique:

inlaid

Dimensions:

h. 15,6 cm

Acquisition date:

Formerly in Peter the Great's Siberian collection

Inventory Number:

Си.1727-1/131

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