• Vase "The Sacrifice of Iphigenia"

    Dimensions:
    height: 157,0 cm

Vase "The Sacrifice of Iphigenia"

Ancient Rome, 2nd century A.D.

Iphigenia, the daughter of King Agamemnon who led the Greeks in their campaign against Troy, was sacrificed to Artemis so that the goddess would give a favourable wind for their ships. The huge army was unable to set sail as the deity was angry over the killing of a sacred deer. A soothsayer indicated that the King’s daughter could save the ships and the army. During the sacrifice, Artemis took pity on the girl and transported her to her temple in Tauris, the present-day Crimea, where she became the priestess. This event was described by the Ancient Greek playwrights Sophocles, Aeschylus and Euripides and was very popular in the literature of the Ancient World. The Roman sculptor took inspiration from the Greek classical ideals of beauty and treated the subject as an allegory of magnanimity and self-sacrifice.

Title:

Vase "The Sacrifice of Iphigenia"

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Material:

Dimensions:

height: 157,0 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1787; originally in the John Lyde Browne collection

Inventory Number:

ГР-1729

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